What is Sorghum?

Sweet Sorghum is the finished product after boiling down juice exctracted from sorghum cane. The 100% natural juice is cleansed of impurities and concentrated by evaporation in a large open pan into a clear, amber-colored, mild flavored syrup. The syrup retains all of its natural sugars and other nutrients. It is 100% natural and contains no additives.

Where is Sorghum grown?

Sweet Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) is grown most extensively for syrup in the southeastern United States yet making syrup extends from the Gulf States, including Texas, north to Wisconsin and west to Kansas, Iowa and Minnesota. Hancock County, Kentucky (home to Hardship Hills Farm) has long proclaimed itself as the ‘Sorghum Capital of the World’.

Does Sorghum have health benefits?

Sorghum contains many important nutrients such as iron, calcium, and potassium. Before the invention of daily vitamins, many doctors prescribed sorghum as a daily supplement for those low in these nutrients.

How do I use Sorghum?

Today’s nutrition conscious consumers are rediscovering the versatility of sorghum. They are finding that there is hardly a food served that sorghum would not improve. Put sorghum over your pancakes, biscuits or toast, as a topping for your ice cream or in Grandma’s treasured recipes for ginger snaps or gingerbread. Sorghum can be used as a stir-fry base as well as in baked beans; it is a great ingredient to add in homemade breads and can be substituted cup for cup in any recipe that calls for molasses, honey, corn syrup or maple syrup. For today’s chef, sorghum is a nutritious flavoring, a seasoning ingredient that gives any food that delicious taste and aroma that spells HOMEMADE.

What is the difference between Sorghum and Molasses?

Molasses is a by-product of the granulated sugar industry, whereas sorghum is the syrup produced when the extracted juice from the sorghum cane is boiled down.

How can I be sure I am buying pure Sorghum?

The logo below this paragraph was developed by the National Sweet Sorghum Producers and Processors Association (NSSPPA) as a tool to insure that you are buying a pure sorghum product. Each producer in the association is given a number to put on their logo that will identify where and by whom the sorghum was produced. The logo represents pure, unblended Sorghum syrup.

What if my Sorghum crystallizes?

No problem. Sorghum like honey can sometimes crystallize, however, by simply placing it in a pan of warm water or putting it in the microwave will restore it to usable form.

Do I need to refrigerate Sorghum?

No. Sorghum is a natural sweetener and can be treated like honey. Although refrigeration will not hurt your Sorghum, it will make the consistency thicker and harder to spread. Storing Sorghum at room temperature is recommended.

Can diabetics use Sorghum as a sugar substitute?

No. Although Sorghum is a natural product, it is still a sugar and will affect blood reading accordingly. Consult your physician to see if Sorghum can be incorporated into your diet.

Can diabetics use Sorghum as a sugar substitute?

No. Although Sorghum is a natural product, it is still a sugar and will affect blood reading accordingly. Consult your physician to see if Sorghum can be incorporated into your diet.

Nutritional Value

Serving size: one tablespoon (20 gm.)

Protein, %Nx6.25 300 mg Copper 0.03 mg
Ether, extractables 149 mg Iron 0.76 mg.
Fiber, crude 20 mg Magnesium 20.00 mg
Ash 490 mg Phosphorous 11.00 mg
Carbohydrates (calc.) 15 gm Potassium 200.00 mg
Calories (calc.) 62 Sodium 1.60 mg
Sugars, reducing 8 gm Zinc 0.80 mg
Sugars, total as invert 15 gm Nitrate 3.20 mg
Calcium 30 mg Riboflavin 0.03 mg

More Information on Sorghum

National Sweet Sorghum Producers and Processors Association
University of Kentucky

Contact Us

Uncle Josh’s Sorghum

8865 State Route 69

Hawesville, Kentucky 42348

Sales@UncleJoshsSorghum.com